This Blog is a companion to the training video produced for the UBS Learning Zone on how to shoot interviews.

5. Getting good sound

Martin Johnson - Sunday, January 01, 2017
5. Getting good sound Sound is sometimes the poor cousin when it comes to shooting interviews, but research shows that audiences will accept poor images more readily, than poor sound. Getting both right is a bonus! The best place to record good sound in an interview is with the microphone placed around 30-40 cms from the person's mouth. In practice, there are really only two ways to do this - one is with a lavalier microphone clipped to the person's shirt/tie/coat collar OR with a mi .. click to read full post.
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4. Reversals, noddies and two-shots

Martin Johnson - Saturday, December 31, 2016
4. Reversals, noddies and two-shots Once you have completed the interview, it's always helpful to shoot some additional shots, especially if you have access to editing facilities. Here's a list of the shots I would get. i. Move the camera further back from where you filmed the interviewee from and frame a two-shot of the interviewer and the person being interviewed. For this to work, the interviewee should pretend to listen to a question, It often helps in this situation if the inter .. click to read full post.
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3. Setting the line

Martin Johnson - Friday, December 30, 2016
3. Setting the 'line of interest' Generally the camera is placed so that it looks over the shoulder of the interviewer, looking at the interviewee. This means the eye-line of the interviewee is just to the side of the camera as they look at the interviewer. You shouldn't see the interviewer in this frame. Once you've decided which side of the interviewer to put the camera (assuming the interviewee and interviewer are facing each other) you need to make sure that any other shots of th .. click to read full post.
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2. Midshot

Martin Johnson - Thursday, December 29, 2016
2. Framing the interviewee When two people talk together, they 'see' each other in a mid-shot. That is from the top of their head to around halfway up the top part of their body. Therefore we frame a person being interviewed so we can see the same amount of their body. If the shot is too close, so we just see their head and maybe a little bit of their shoulders, that's too close for a general interview. We've all seen this sort of shot when the interview gets tense or emotio .. click to read full post.
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1. Shooting Interviews - Introduction

Martin Johnson - Wednesday, December 28, 2016
1. Shooting Interviews Interviews are a key element of much of what we see on television. Every TV news program features interviews with politicians, celebrities and other news makers. An interview is a good way of conveying information to an audience as the interviewer talks to someone who has knowledge about a particular topic. It's said that the interviewer acts on behalf of the audience watching at home. They need to ask questions that get the answers the public  .. click to read full post.
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Recent Posts

  1. 5. Getting good sound Martin Johnson 01-Jan-2017
  2. 4. Reversals, noddies and two-shots Martin Johnson 31-Dec-2016
  3. 3. Setting the line Martin Johnson 30-Dec-2016
  4. 2. Midshot Martin Johnson 29-Dec-2016
  5. 1. Shooting Interviews - Introduction Martin Johnson 28-Dec-2016

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